Taxes

Fish Wrapper Editors Show Ignorance Of Basic Economics

Here's a question to consider. Let's say that your state budget is expected to increase by 20% in the next biennium dur to increased tax revenues. However, your state economy, which, although it has lagged behind the rest of the country, has been doing well, is now showing signs of slowing down. What do you do?

Do you

A) Budget to spend all of that money, propose even more taxes for more spending, and then try to take additional money that is supposed to be returned to corporations out of the economy and into a "rainy day fund"?

or

B) Budget wisely, don't spend all of the increase in revenue, and keep some of the surplus in a rainy day fund?

Teaser: 

Here's a question to consider. Let's say that your state budget is expected to increase by 20% in the next biennium dur to increased tax revenues. However, your state economy, which, although it has lagged behind the rest of the country, has been doing well, is now showing signs of slowing down. What do you do?

Do you

A) Budget to spend all of that money, propose even more taxes for more spending, and then try to take additional money that is supposed to be returned to corporations out of the economy and into a "rainy day fund"?

or

B) Budget wisely, don't spend all of the increase in revenue, and keep some of the surplus in a rainy day fund?

Steve Duin Conveniently Obscures Facts About Nike and Taxes

The other day when I read Steve Duin's column about Nike and how few taxes it pays, something just didn't seem right about it, but I didn't have the time to research it. Fortunately, I don't have to. Michael McBride (aka My Sandmen) has a great column about the hit piece at Townhall.com.

The point of Duin's column was that Nike supposedly supports local schools by making donations, but due to lobbying efforts, pays very little corporate income tax, thereby shorting the local schools of tax revenue.

Teaser: 

The other day when I read Steve Duin's column about Nike and how few taxes it pays, something just didn't seem right about it, but I didn't have the time to research it. Fortunately, I don't have to. Michael McBride (aka My Sandmen) has a great column about the hit piece at Townhall.com.

The point of Duin's column was that Nike supposedly supports local schools by making donations, but due to lobbying efforts, pays very little corporate income tax, thereby shorting the local schools of tax revenue.

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