Smoking

Avoiding Personal Responsibility Okay For Editors

For some reason, it seems that liberals like to avoid responsibility for their own actions and expect other people to make up for that lack of responsibility. You see it in their continuous push for socialism instead of capitalism, and in their desire to make someone else pay for not using their brains.

Today's demonstration of this avoidance is an editorial in the Dead Fish Wrapper regarding a lawsuit against Philip Morris. For those not familiar with the story, here is a recap. In 1999, Mayola Williams won a lawsuit against Philip Morris USA for the death of her husband Jesse. Jesse had smoked two packs of cigarrettes per day for 30 years and had died of lung cancer in 1997. The jury had awarded her $821,485 in compensatory damages and $79.5 million in punitive damages. Philip Morris appealed, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Last week the court remanded the case back to the Oregon Supreme Court on the grounds that the jury had not been properly instructed that it could punish Philip Morris only for the harm done to the plaintiff, not to other smokers. In other words, the punitive damage award was way too high, and needs to be scaled back.

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For some reason, it seems that liberals like to avoid responsibility for their own actions and expect other people to make up for that lack of responsibility. You see it in their continuous push for socialism instead of capitalism, and in their desire to make someone else pay for not using their brains.

Today's demonstration of this avoidance is an editorial in the Dead Fish Wrapper regarding a lawsuit against Philip Morris. For those not familiar with the story, here is a recap. In 1999, Mayola Williams won a lawsuit against Philip Morris USA for the death of her husband Jesse. Jesse had smoked two packs of cigarrettes per day for 30 years and had died of lung cancer in 1997. The jury had awarded her $821,485 in compensatory damages and $79.5 million in punitive damages. Philip Morris appealed, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Last week the court remanded the case back to the Oregon Supreme Court on the grounds that the jury had not been properly instructed that it could punish Philip Morris only for the harm done to the plaintiff, not to other smokers. In other words, the punitive damage award was way too high, and needs to be scaled back.

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