Joseph Rose

Fish Wrapper Hides Dark Side of Anti-War Protest

Considering the biased coverage given to the anti-war protesters (and the much larger in number) counter protesters in Washington D.C on March 17th by papers like the Washington Post, I expected the same from the Dead Fish Wrapper when they covered the anti-war protests that took place in Portland the next day. Needless to say, I wasn't surprised at all. There was one difference from the Washington DC protests, though, and that was what the Fish Wrapper hid; instead of hiding a larger number of counter protesters, they hid the dark, repulsive side of the protest.

Teaser: 

Considering the biased coverage given to the anti-war protesters (and the much larger in number) counter protesters in Washington D.C on March 17th by papers like the Washington Post, I expected the same from the Dead Fish Wrapper when they covered the anti-war protests that took place in Portland the next day. Needless to say, I wasn't surprised at all. There was one difference from the Washington DC protests, though, and that was what the Fish Wrapper hid; instead of hiding a larger number of counter protesters, they hid the dark, repulsive side of the protest.

Fish Wrapper Paints Brandon Mayfield as Victim, Ignores Other Evidence

By now, everyone (or most everyone) knows the sad story of Brandon Mayfield. In the aftermath of the 2004 Madrid train bombings, a fingerprint found on a bag containing detonators similar to the ones used in the bombings. When it was run through the FBI's AFIS fingerprint identification system, a list of 15 possible matches was returned, and Mayfield's was one of them. Three more FBI fingerprint analysts concluded that it indeed did belong to Mayfield. However, the Spanish National Police did not come to the same conclusion. The FBI continued to investigate him, and arrested him and held him for two weeks under a material witness order. Eventually, he was released, and the FBI apologized. The details of the investigation can be found in the US DOJ Inspector General's report on the case. He sued the federal government for violations of his civil rights (among other things), and eventually settled for $2 million.

Teaser: 

By now, everyone (or most everyone) knows the sad story of Brandon Mayfield. In the aftermath of the 2004 Madrid train bombings, a fingerprint found on a bag containing detonators similar to the ones used in the bombings. When it was run through the FBI's AFIS fingerprint identification system, a list of 15 possible matches was returned, and Mayfield's was one of them. Three more FBI fingerprint analysts concluded that it indeed did belong to Mayfield. However, the Spanish National Police did not come to the same conclusion. The FBI continued to investigate him, and arrested him and held him for two weeks under a material witness order. Eventually, he was released, and the FBI apologized. The details of the investigation can be found in the US DOJ Inspector General's report on the case. He sued the federal government for violations of his civil rights (among other things), and eventually settled for $2 million.

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